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Brian Huggins   Meet Brian, one of our travel experts for Botswana.


Brian has always nurtured his passion for travel in his spare time. He's traveled the world, visiting over 40 countries. Over time, this passion grew to the point where he began to search for opportunities to work in the travel industry. He's been an African Specialist at Mango Safaris since early 2006.


Lagoon Camp

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Lagoon Camp

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Lagoon Camp - Lagoon Camp. Copyright Mango African Safaris-Lagoon Camp. Just a spacer

Lagoon is perched on the banks of the wild Kwando River, overlooking the Mudumu National Park in the Namibian Caprivi Strip. The camp is nestled beneath towering ebony and marula trees and accommodates up to 16 guests in eight traditionally styled 'tents.'



See thumbnails of all photos for this point of interest.

Overview



The daily safari routine usually involves an early morning wake up call, and a gathering around the fireside for piping hot tea and coffee, a bowl of sumptuous porridge and freshly baked muffins. As well as the clean early morning air and dazzling sun rise, an early departure greatly increases the chances of unusual sightings, as the majority of mammals are active at the beginning and end of the day when temperatures are lower.

Game drives are undertaken in custom designed Toyota game viewing vehicles seating no more than six guests at a time in two rows of three. The use of only two rows ensures that guests are never so far from the front of the vehicle that they are unable to hear the guide or tracker's interpretation, even while driving. Guests are guided by a two person team of professional guide and tracker - a special feature of the Kwando Safaris wildlife experience. The two person team enables the guide to communicate points of interest and the complex interrelations that exist throughout the natural world, while the tracker ensures no sightings or tracks are missed.

The evening/ night drives are a Kwando Safaris speciality. The drive starts in the late afternoon as the sun's rays are dipping to the west and the day's heat is declining. After a leisurely pause for the traditional sundowner, and as the African day is transformed into a soft colourful evening canvas, the night drive begins. The mystery unfolds as the creatures of the night, especially the predators, are revealed by spotlight, often unexpectedly.

Game walks are not hikes; they are slow comfortable strolls meant to provide you with a chance to experience the wilderness at a natural pace. Any walk can be combined with a game drive or mokoro and the length of walk can be adjusted to suit your personal desires or level of fitness.

The boat experience is a soothing tonic, a contrast to the vigorous efforts of searching for mammals from a vehicle or on foot. Sit back and while away the hours, stopping to gaze at a multitude of spectacular birds and bathing elephant and enjoy the vistas of the river systems. However, don't be surprised should the peace be shattered by the snort of a territorial hippo warning the boat of his presence! Double-decker boats are used to provide a better vantage point and offer a wonderful position to enjoy the waterways and their varied inhabitants.

The traditional dug out canoe is surely the definitive Okavango Delta experience. The complete stillness of an early morning, disturbed only by the sound of the water dripping from the 'ngashe' (wooden pole used to move the canoe), and the eerie call of the fish eagle echoing across the water, is a sublime experience. The mokoro was designed to move across areas with low water levels by the indigenous peoples who inhabited the Delta and who explored the waterways and floodplains in search of food. Today, these same mekoro provide an opportunity to glide through this varied and unique habitat using the traditional skills handed down through the generations.

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