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Brian Huggins   Meet Brian, one of our travel experts for Botswana.


Brian has always nurtured his passion for travel in his spare time. He's traveled the world, visiting over 40 countries. Over time, this passion grew to the point where he began to search for opportunities to work in the travel industry. He's been an African Specialist at Mango Safaris since early 2006.


Chitabe Lediba

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Chitabe Lediba

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Chitabe Lediba - Chitabe Lediba. Copyright Mango African Safaris. Just a spacer

Chitabe Lediba Camp is a smaller, more intimate camp located on the same island as its sister, Chitabe Camp, in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. A luxury African safari at Chitabe Lediba Camp takes advantage of the diverse array of habitats that are all in close proximity - and the prolific wildlife that lives there.

Overview

Chitabe Lediba Camp in the Chitabe Concession neighbours the Moremi Game Reserve in the south-east of the Okavango Delta. Its wide range of habitats makes for amazing wildlife sightings.

Chitabe Lediba Camp is smaller than its sister, Chitabe, and is ideal for small groups or families. Its two family units have adjoining bedrooms and en-suite bathrooms. All five spacious Meru-style tents are built on raised decks. En-suite bathrooms have outdoor showers with panoramic views of the Delta. The dining area, lounge and pool have a glorious vantage over the small lediba (remnant lagoon that has become a waterhole) after which the camp is named and where multitudes of wildlife come to drink.

Highlights
  • Diverse and abundant plains game followed by their fierce predators is a classic scene at Chitabe Lediba
  • An intimate camp that is ideal for small groups or families
  • Wild dogs are often the stars of the show at Chitabe Lediba



See thumbnails of all photos for this point of interest.

Overview



Chitabe Lediba Camp is located in the Chitabe Concession, which covers 28,000 hectares of pristine Okavango Delta wilderness. It borders the well known Moremi Game Reserve and is nestled between two main river systems, the Gomoti to the east and the Santantadibe to the west.

Chitabe Lediba Camp is unique even in the Okavango Delta in that it harbours such a variety of habitats in close proximity, ranging from classic Okavango Delta scenery with Illala palms dotting floodplains to open savannah and acacia woodlands. A finger of perennial swamps inundated by water throughout the year extends into the Chitabe Concession and the area is also dominated by seasonally flooded areas which transform 56% of the concession from dry floodplains into a lush oasis, when the annual flood waters meander through. All this gives rise to a surprising diversity of species, which allows Chitabe Lediba Camp to offer guests a wide range of luxury African safaris, game viewing and birding experiences.

The high numbers of impala in the area means that leopard are often seen near Chitabe Lediba Camp. Also encountered are buffalo, elephant, lion and occasional sightings of wild dog, the subject of the Botswana Wild Dog Research Project that takes place in the area.

The birdlife is excellent and varies throughout the year, depending on water levels and season. Raptors are abundant here: including the African Hawk Eagle and the Hooded Vulture often nests on the island. Game drives in the palm-filled landscape of Chitabe Lediba Camp often produce families of Ground Hornbill, Greater Honeyguide, Scarlet-chested Sunbird, Red-billed Hornbill, Gabar Goshawk and coveys of Red-billed Francolin.

Chitabe Lediba Camp contributes to the Botswana Predator Conservation Research Project. Dave and Helene Hamman, the owners of Chitabe Camp and Chitabe Lediba Camp, have dedicated many years to photographing the African wild dog and their efforts, combined with the extensive knowledge of Dr. "Tico" McNutt, culminated in the book, Running Wild: Dispelling the Myths of the African Wild Dog. Ongoing research, as well as addressing the surrounding communities' attitudes towards these animals, has resulted in a gradual increase in awareness of the plight of the African wild dog.

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